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Cheap Flights to Afghanistan

Cheap Flights to Afghanistan

Getting to Afghanistan

Two major international airports operate within Afghanistan: Kandahar International Airport and Kabul International Airport. Neither of these airports operates at capacity and services are limited. A new, modern terminal was supposed to be completed in 2008, but construction has been delayed. Travelers can expect long lines and delays at security checkpoints, immigration and baggage claim.

Airports

Besides the two international airports, Afghanistan has four domestic airports that are considered major. These airports are named for the cities in which they reside in Herat, Jalalabad, Kunduz and Mazari Sharif. Afghanistan also has a wide choice of regional domestic airports in 17 different cities, as well as the two military bases at Bagram and Shindand.

Airlines

There are a number of domestic and regional air carriers operating in the country. Ariana Air, Kam Air, Iran Air, Pamir Air, Pakistan National Airlines, and Air India operate there. Ariana Air runs periodic flights from Pakistan, India and Iran and daily flights from Dubai. However, service is considered to be rather limited, and this airline is noted for its poor safety record. Pamir Air offers daily routes from Dubai to Kabul at a fairly reasonable rate. Flights to smaller domestic airports in Afghanistan may be possible from smaller private charter companies; however, seats on these flights are reportedly difficult to come by and may also be more expensive and not the cheapest flight option available. Another option is to fly into Tehran and then attempt to cross the Afghani border by car or bus. However, tight border security and the very real possibility of being bribed, robbed or kidnapped along the way, (not to mention the expected travel delays), might prove more inconvenient and costly than other means.

Other Money-Saving Tips

Eating, drinking and local transport are relatively cheap in Afghanistan, but plan on roughing it if you don't want to pay the price for a comfortable bed, shower and something other than 'street' food. The going rate for a single room at a mid-range hotel costs AFN1500 to AFG3000, which equates to about USD32.00 to USD63.00. Backpacking and camping can be accomplished on a virtual shoestring. Avoid the holy month of Ramadan, a.k.a. Ramazan, as finding anything to eat or drink during the day will be next to impossible and many establishments close completely for the month. Air fare is usually elevated during this time as Afghanis from around the world will travel home to be close to family and friends during this holiest of times.

In Closing

Due to Afghanistan's military strife right now, you might consider waiting until a more opportune time to travel there, unless you plan to stay in one of the major cities. Gallivanting around the countryside is definitely discouraged and some of the most beautiful and awe-inspiring sites are off the beaten path.

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Afghanistan is a landlocked country with inhospitable terrain bordered by Pakistan, Iran, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan. The country also shares an inaccessible border with China. Traveling to Afghanistan is problematic at best. Travel within the country is hampered by safety/security issues, power shortages, poor health conditions and chronic infrastructure problems. Most countries discourage tourists - particularly westerners, from visiting this country due to the chaos, violence and poor living conditions. The country's capital is Kabul, a hectic place, as it rebuilds after its near total destruction by the post 9/11 bombing and the exit of the Taliban. The rubble is being cleared and new construction abounds. Restaurants and bazaars are emerging to cater to the nouveau riche Afghani people. Babur's Gardens have been restored and Chicken Street, where Afghanistan's savviest souvenir sellers reside, is alive and well. The Kabul Museum is a prime example of Afghanistan's labor to retain its heritage. Mazar-e-Sharif, in northern Afghanistan is a relatively modern city with many amenities and is a good base camp for travel to Balkh and Samangan. One of the poorest, yet most beautiful sections of Afghanistan is a wide valley at the heart of the Hazarajat. The city of Bamiyan used to be a place of pilgrimage by Buddhist followers. After the ravages of war, the iconic Buddha statues carved from the cliffs, are in rubble, thanks to the Taliban. The ruins are still an amazing site and this is one place that you should not miss when visiting Afghanistan. While the country is mostly made up of mountains and desert, it also has some wonderful sites to behold. Afghanistan's first national park, the Band-e Amir has a gorgeous collection of five turquoise lakes. It also has a lovely camping site - just watch out for those land mines! Another popular destination is the Panjshir Valley or, "Five Lions." This is a luscious green valley north of Kabul, near the Hindu Kush Mountains. Other notable sites include the famous Minaret of Jam, the second largest minaret in the world, built off the beaten path in the tiny village of Jam in western Afghanistan. And for the truly brazen thrill-seeker, there's the infamous Khyber Pass. Once a part of the "hippie trail" in the fifties and sixties, it is now known for more nefarious reasons. Foreigners are forbidden to enter Khyber for security reasons and risk imprisonment and death if they choose to do so.

Afghanistan is a landlocked country with inhospitable terrain bordered by Pakistan, Iran, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan. The country also shares an inaccessible border with China. Traveling to Afghanistan is problematic at best. Travel within the country is hampered by safety/security issues, power shortages, poor health conditions and chronic infrastructure problems. Most countries discourage tourists - particularly westerners, from visiting this country due to the chaos, violence and poor living conditions. The country's capital is Kabul, a hectic place, as it rebuilds after its near total destruction by the post 9/11 bombing and the exit of the Taliban. The rubble is being cleared and new construction abounds. Restaurants and bazaars are emerging to cater to the nouveau riche Afghani people. Babur's Gardens have been restored and Chicken Street, where Afghanistan's savviest souvenir sellers reside, is alive and well. The Kabul Museum is a prime example of Afghanistan's labor to retain its heritage. Mazar-e-Sharif, in northern Afghanistan is a relatively modern city with many amenities and is a good base camp for travel to Balkh and Samangan. One of the poorest, yet most beautiful sections of Afghanistan is a wide valley at the heart of the Hazarajat. The city of Bamiyan used to be a place of pilgrimage by Buddhist followers. After the ravages of war, the iconic Buddha statues carved from the cliffs, are in rubble, thanks to the Taliban. The ruins are still an amazing site and this is one place that you should not miss when visiting Afghanistan. While the country is mostly made up of mountains and desert, it also has some wonderful sites to behold. Afghanistan's first national park, the Band-e Amir has a gorgeous collection of five turquoise lakes. It also has a lovely camping site - just watch out for those land mines! Another popular destination is the Panjshir Valley or, "Five Lions." This is a luscious green valley north of Kabul, near the Hindu Kush Mountains. Other notable sites include the famous Minaret of Jam, the second largest minaret in the world, built off the beaten path in the tiny village of Jam in western Afghanistan. And for the truly brazen thrill-seeker, there's the infamous Khyber Pass. Once a part of the "hippie trail" in the fifties and sixties, it is now known for more nefarious reasons. Foreigners are forbidden to enter Khyber for security reasons and risk imprisonment and death if they choose to do so.

Afghanistan Airports Information

Flights to Afghanistan

Hotels in Afghanistan